Phlebotomy Classes

Choosing The Right Phlebotomy Classes

Whether you are looking for a new career or thinking about going back to school to find a better job, this is a great time to invest yourself in the field of phlebotomy. The demand for these professionals are at an all time high and the potential earnings as a phlebotomist is quickly becoming one of the top paid professions in the allied health field.

Where To Start?

The first thing you need to do is find a highly reputable accredited phlebotomy training program in your area. These are fairly easy to find in todays internet age as these are listed everywhere online by doing a basic internet search. One thing to keep in mind when searching for a good phlebotomy training program is that the phlebotomy school you choose is accredited by one of the national phlebotomy organizations.

Once you find an accredited program, just simply enroll and become accepted into the school. Most of these schools have flexible class hours which makes it great for people that are currently working. This will enable these people to attend phlebotomy classes as well.

What To Expect Taking Phlebotomy Classes

Phlebotomy classes are broken down into two parts; an in-class training and a hands-on clinical training. You must complete both parts of this phlebotomy training in order to complete the program.
The time it takes to fully complete the training will depend on the individual school in which you choose, but typically it takes anywhere from six months to a year to complete.

The in-class training is designed to prepare you on the knowledge of phlebotomy and the human body. Typical classes will include a phlebotomy introduction class, human anatomy class, medical terminology classes, etc. This is typically the hardest part of the training because you must be able to acquire this knowledge to progress to the second part of the phlebotomy course.

The second part of phlebotomy classes consist of the hands-on training. This is by far the most enjoyable part of the training, because you finally get to work in a clinical type setup and work hands on with people. Most phlebotomy programs will require you to work directly under a trained medical professional in a clinical setting such as a physician office or hospital. To complete this part of training you must learn how to successfully perform venipunctures, because in order to recieve your certificate of completion you must successfully complete a set number of these venipuncture procedures.

So as you can see phlebotomy classes are fairly demanding, but for the ones that successfully complete the phlebotomy training classes, the opportunities for success are vast in this field.

For further in-depth knowledge on phlebotomy classes and training:Wikipedia –

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phlebotomy
American Medical Technologists –
http://www.americanmedtech.org/Certification/Phlebotomist.aspx
The National Phlebotomy Association –
www.nationalphlebotomy.org
American Phlebotomy Association –
www.apa2.com
American Society Of Phlebotomy Technitions –
www.aspt.org

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