Fitness and the workplace (+ egg bake)

This semester I am taking my first ever business class.

It’s called Management and Behavior in Organizations, which is pretty much right up my alley for Industrial/Organizational Psychology.

Our first project assignment? A fitness plan. <—uh, heck yes!

Basically, our assignment is to exercise at least 3 times per week for the duration of the semester. Our professor hopes that we will feel the benefits of exercise and then continue to make exercise a part of our lives even after the class has ended.

I am all for this! He made it clear that there is no such thing as starting too small. Even if you can only exercise for 1 minute per day (for health-related reasons or otherwise)—than at least you’re moving.

A lot of students in class were confused by this. “Well, what does fitness have to do with behavior in organizations?”

Oh, I don’t know how about everything? I think that being physically fit and healthy is often overlooked when considering job satisfaction and productivity in the workplace.

Only some of the research-documented benefits of personal fitness:

1. Improved sensory perception and motor responses

2. Decreased incidence of degenerative disease

3. Less susceptibility to illness

4. Retarded aging effects

5. Increased energy level

6. Enhanced stamina

7. Improved muscle tone, power, strength, and endurance

8. Increased coordination and range of motion

9. Better posture and flexibility

10. Improved sleep

11. Relief of tension, stress, and frustration

12. Improved mood

13. Increased life satisfaction

14. Enhanced ability to relax

15. Greater emotional stability and balance

16. Increased initiative and motivation

17. More fulfilling interpersonal relationships

18. Improved self-concept

Who wouldn’t want every single benefit on that list? Each benefit can play a role in the workplace, as well.

Wouldn’t you prefer to work with employees who have increased motivation and initiative, greater emotional balance, improved mood, fewer sick days, etc.? I know I would.

And this is without even mentioning the fact that companies who have healthy employees will in turn have lower health care costs.

Personally, I believe that companies should provide either a fitness membership or a work-place gym. At the very least, they should offer a discounted fitness club membership. A healthy living workshop wouldn’t be too shabby either.

In a nutshell, employees who are both mentally and physically healthy and happy lead to a more effective and productive workplace.

What do you think? Is asking your employer to offer options for living healthy asking too much?

While you mull over your answer, I’ll show you an easy egg bake for one.

Kale & Beet Egg Bake for one <—yes, more beets!

What you’ll need:

  • one oven-safe bowl (or mini pan—whatever you have)
  • 2 eggs (organic, free-range for me)
  • olive oil or nonstick spray
  • kale & beet (although any veggies would work)

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Spray your bowl with olive oil or nonstick spray.

Add your veggies. Mine came in this form:

That would be the veggie remnants from my juicer! No wasting food for me!

Cover your veggies with your eggs. I mixed my eggs with a bit of coconut milk for extra fluff!

I also sprinkled some nutritional yeast over the top.

Bake at 350 degrees for about 15 minutes or until your eggs are thoroughly cooked.

I paired mine with a toasted Arnold thin topped with apple butter + cinnamon.

Yum!

So back to the burning question: Do you think that companies should offer health club memberships to their employees?

Have a fab day!

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