• Living with Heart Failure

    Being diagnosed with heart failure is frightening, and living with limitations imposed by the disease can be a challenge. However, you are not alone: 2.5 million women in the United States are currently living with heart failure.1 On average, a woman with heart failure will live another 10 years.2 With proper treatment and care many women survive for much

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  • Exercise Training for Heart Failure

    What is exercise training for heart failure? Heart failure causes symptoms such as shortness of breath and swelling that make physical activity difficult. In the past, women with heart failure were cautioned to avoid physical exertion; it was thought that bed rest could minimize symptoms and prevent the heart’s function from getting worse. We now know that the

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  • Heart Failure Rehabilitation

    What is heart failure rehabilitation? A heart failure rehabilitation program is medically supervised program designed to help you control your symptoms and resume an active and productive life within the limits of your disease. The program should be adapted to fit your specific needs and goals, and may include a combination of exercise training, nutritional counseling, medication follow-ups,

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  • Heart Transplant

    What is a heart transplant? A heart transplant is a surgical procedure in which a diseased heart is removed and replaced with a healthy heart from a deceased donor. It is the final treatment option for women with end-stage heart failure severe heart failure that has not responded to other treatments including medication, implantable devices, and surgery.

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  • Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD)

    What is a left ventricular assist device? Most women with heart failure caused by blood pumping problems (systolic heart failure) respond well to standard treatments and can enjoy a long, fulfilling life. However, some women continue to have severe heart failure symptoms even at rest, and any further loss of heart function could make the heart unable

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  • Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT)

    What is Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT)? Some women with heart failure lose coordination between the two sides of their heart, preventing the heart from pumping efficiently. This causes fluid to build up in the lungs and legs, worsening heart failure symptoms such as shortness of breath and swelling. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) uses an implanted pacemaker to send electrical signals

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