• Smoking & Vein Disease Risk

    A smoker is anyone who has smoked 100 cigarettes in her lifetime and currently smokes some days or every day. You may already know that smoking raises your risk of heart disease, but the damage caused by smoking is not limited to your heart. The harmful chemicals in cigarette smoke affect all the blood vessels

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  • Race, Ethnicity & Vein Disease Risk

    What do race and ethnicity mean? The terms “race” and “ethnicity” are used to refer to people of similar cultural, religious, tribal, or geographic ancestry. However, both terms are notoriously difficult to define, and the divisions are not always based on biology rather than appearance. Despite these troubled terms, doctors have found differences in health

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  • Pregnancy & Vein Disease Risk

    How does pregnancy affect my vein disease risk? Pregnancy increases a woman’s risk of developing blood clots in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis, or DVT) that can travel to the lungs, causing a potentially deadly pulmonary embolism. Pulmonary embolism is the number one cause of maternal death in the US. About 1 in every

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  • Other Heart Conditions & Vein Disease Risk

    How do other heart and blood vessel conditions affect my risk of vein disease? Some types of heart and blood vessel increase your risk of developing blood clots in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis, or DVT) that can travel to the lungs, causing a potentially deadly pulmonary embolism. Women with heart failure, a weakened heart that

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  • Diabetes & Vein Disease Risk

    What is diabetes? Diabetes is a serious, lifelong condition in which the body cannot properly control the level of sugar in the blood. Insulin is a hormone that regulates sugar (glucose) levels in the blood. In women with diabetes, the body does not make enough insulin or cannot use insulin as well as it should. During digestion, carbohydrates

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  • Blood Clotting Problems & Vein Disease Risk

    What are blood clotting problems? The blood thickens, or “clots” in response to injury. Normally, this is a good thing: blood clots stop the bleeding and allow the body to begin to heal the damaged vessel. However, in some women, the body’s coagulation machinery is imbalanced, causing clots to form too easily in response to

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